Review: Preoccupations’ New Material Is Frustrating

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

Alright, I guess it’s time I just rip the band-aid off, right? In all honesty, I’ve been putting this off for weeks, because even now, I’m having a difficult time wrapping my head around New Material, the third full-length album from Canada’s own Preoccupations. Since I adopted my new writing policy a few years ago, I’ve been lucky enough to have most of the records I’ve covered fall into one of two categories: I either enjoyed it or I didn’t. There may have been one or two albums where I was kind of split, torn on the severity of my like or dislike, but New Material isn’t one of those albums. Continue reading

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Review: MCU’s Spider-Man Experiences Growing Pains In Far From Home

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The year is 2019. The decade is coming to a close, society is living in a post-Endgame world, and Marvel is looking to close the book on what will arguably go down in history as one of the most ambitious film projects of all time–the Infinity Saga. With one more film slated to act as the story’s epilogue, where do you go? How do you seek finality in something that, to a certain degree, almost feels infinite? Well, apparently, you take your universe’s mostly widely accessible character, pit him against his most theatrical foe, cross your fingers and hope for the best. Continue reading

Massy Tadjedin’s Last Night (2010): Finding Ambiguity In Infidelity

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When it comes to addressing the topic of romance and romantic turmoil on the big screen, I think, at some point, a stigma was created after a certain bread of romantic “chick flicks” became the norm in Hollywood; films that never truly aimed to address the struggles with romance. Instead, they opted to cast the flavors of the month from gossip magazines, put them in artificially created situations of struggle to serve as a catalyst for growth, the perfect couple splits, there’s a moment of self-reflection, and the aforementioned couple reunites at the end. Roll credits. But that’s not romance, is it?

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Review: Flowertruck Keep Things Light On Mostly Sunny

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

In the age of digital streaming, there’s a new crop of bands bursting on the scene every year, and back in 2015, Flowertruck became part of that trend when they released their Dirt EP. Hailing from Sydney, Australia, the Indie Rock quartet took listeners by surprise with their unique blend of Indie Rock, Jangle Pop, and New Wave, which was complemented nicely by a set of vocal chops that almost came across as Operatic. For a collection of opening tunes, Dirt was undeniably charming, if a little scatterbrained, so it was hard not to get excited when the band began teasing the release of their first full-length, Mostly Sunny. Continue reading

Review: Moaning Shine Bright On Their Self-Titled Debut

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

I don’t remember how or when, but at the beginning of 2018, “Don’t Go,” the lead single and opening track from this record, managed to tumble into my life as I was partaking in another Post-Punk binge. Up until that point, I had never heard of Moaning, but “Don’t Go” was an irresistible, full-throttle banger, and when I found out the band’s debut would be releasing in less than a month, I couldn’t have been more excited. Would the rest of the album be just as good? At second thought, would it be even better? Continue reading

Celebrating 10 Years of Make More: Is It Sapient’s Best Album?

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Back in 2009, Portland’s Sandpeople crew was in full force, as the Hip Hop collective would release IAME’s sophomore record I Am My Enemy, Illmaculate and OnlyOne’s double solo album Police Brutality, and the sixth group record Long Story Short, as well as today’s album in question, Make More, the third solo album from Sapient. Just a note before we kick things off: there’s no way of knowing the album’s actual release date because I found two or three dates when I was searching online. May 19th was one that came up, and since that was a Tuesday back in 2009, the day of new releases at the time, I made an executive decision. Continue reading

Review: There’s Little Catharsis To Be Found On Machine Head’s Latest Album

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

Before jumping into this, it’s important to make one thing clear about Machine Head: the band’s discography is a complete mess. With Catharsis marking the ninth outing from the Oakland natives, you’d be hard pressed to find someone in the group’s fandom who admits to loving all of their material. While I’m sure those people exist, they are few and far between, and I think most would agree 2007’s The Blackening marked an important turning point for the band’s career. Unfortunately, all good things must come to an end, as the ship started to veer into unexpected territory on 2014’s Bloodstone & Diamonds, before crashing completely on last year’s Catharsis. Continue reading