Review: Eminem Has An Identity Crisis On Revival

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

For over two decades, Marshall Mathers, aka Eminem, has been running his mouth and dominating the Hip Hop charts. Even when he largely turned into a recluse following the death of his best friend and former band mate Proof, his songs were still bursting from contemporary Pop radio stations, and speculation of his inevitable return buzzed as fans waited five years for his fifth studio album–mind you, this was pre-social media, and the internet as it exists now was nothing more than an idea. However, since that return, in different capacities, Eminem has had a difficult time captivating his audience en masse, and unfortunately, Revival, the Detroit emcee’s eighth album, doesn’t fare much better. Continue reading

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Review: Julien Baker Confronts Her Darkness On Turn Out The Lights

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

There’s no two ways about it, when it comes to Turn Out The Lights, the sophomore effort from Tennessee’s Julien Baker, I’ve been procrastinating. Hard. When I heard Sprained Ankle for the first time at the start of 2017, the record came in my life when I needed it most, which meant my excitement was through the roof when this album was announced and subsequently promoted. The artwork is gorgeous, I loved the lead singles–“Appointments” and the title song–and it felt like Baker was doing a good job of progressing her sound. Then I finally heard the album. Continue reading

Review: Leaving / Left Has Wool See Reaching New Heights

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

Since its inception in 2014, the Wool See project–spearheaded by Sandpeople’s own IAME–has been an interesting thing to behold. With total disregard of expectations, and complete abandonment of traditional song structure, the records released under the Wool See brand became increasingly more dense and complex; something that reached an inevitable tipping point on 2015’s LifeAlert. Like To Pimp A Butterfly and Compton earlier that year, I found there was just too much to process and consider if I were to review it in a traditional manner, so I left well enough alone and enjoyed the record in silence. Continue reading

My Week In Music: 9/16 – 9/22

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After the crazy influx of releases last week, my musical endeavors were considerably less intense this week, which thankfully allowed me to spend some more time revisiting older albums I hadn’t listened to in a while. However, there were still some notable drops to come, and if you’ve been keeping up the past few weeks, yes, that does include more deM atlaS.

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