Review: Sadistik’s Altars Is a Dark Exploration of Blasphemy

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Note: My music reviews will always be “late.” It is my belief that albums should be listened to in different moods, settings, and after extended breaks, all while conditioning yourself to accept what you were given as opposed to what you wanted. Only then can you give a legitimate and honest critique of the material.

As I began doing the prep-work for this review, I kept trying to hone-in on an adjective or theme I could use to summarize Altars, the latest record from Sadistik, and the more I thought about it, the more perplexed I became, because Altars, like the artist who created it, is complex. Like all good albums, this one is layered, it’s unpredictable, and at times, it can be abrasive or even shocking. Still, it never feels gratuitous, nor does Sadistik’s lyrical musings on religion feel like they’re meant to offend. Instead, without any condescension, Cody Foster is simply trying to untangle the web of societal norms until he comes to a conclusion that feels rational to him as a human being. Continue reading

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